Customer Transparency

One of our international client groups visiting Whole Foods. It's one of the highlights of their U.S. visit. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.
One of our international client groups visiting Whole Foods. It’s one of the highlights of their U.S. visit. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

One of the great benchmarks we’ve shared with our clients is the customer-centric work of Whole Foods. There are many things this unique grocery store chain does well, but one thing they really try to do is be transparent about their customer service. Visit most any store, and you’ll find a plaque similar to this:

Customers take advantage of sharing their thoughts and concerns at Whole Foods because they know they are going to be heard. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.
Customers take advantage of sharing their thoughts and concerns at Whole Foods because they know they are going to be heard. Photo by J. Jeff Kober.

Do you ever wonder what happens when you fill out a customer comment form? You need not wonder at Whole Foods, because they post your comment–good, bad or ugly–in front of everyone at the store. They also address the customer’s concerns when needed, and post those as well. It’s a little thing, that makes customers feel like they are heard and understood. And in our book, Lead With Your Customer, being heard and understood is the first great need people have. They want to feel like someone is really listening to them and to their concerns.

Ask yourself:

  • How do you listen to your customers?
  • How do you create transparency about what’s working and not working in your business?
  • How do you address customer concerns as they occur?

For more insights like these, be sure to obtain a copy of Lead With Your Customer. It not only offers great insights about providing superior customer service, but importantly, how to create a culture that supports that kind of customer service. It’s what World Class companies do–especially organizations like Whole Foods.

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